Curriculum Connections

Grade Ten: The Two World Wars

The following are some the curriculum expectations that connect to our programming. These will either be covered through our on-site program or the Suggested Post-Visit Activities for your grade level:

CANADIAN HISTORY – Academic (CHC2D) and Applied (CHC2P)

OVERALL EXPECTATIONS:

Communities: Local, National and Global

  • Assess Canada’s participation in war and contributions to peacekeeping and security (CHC2D)
  • Evaluate Canada’s participation in war and contributions to peacekeeping and security (CHC2P)

  • Methods of Historical Inquiry and Communication

  • Formulate questions on topics and issues in the history of Canada since 1914, and use appropriate methods of historical research to locate, gather, evaluate, and organize relevant information from a variety of sources
  • Interpret and analyse information gathered through research, employing concepts and approaches appropriate to historical inquiry
  • Communicate the results of historical inquiries, using appropriate terms and concepts and a variety of forms of communications

  • SPECIFIC EXPECTATIONS:

    Communities: Local, National and Global

    Canada’s Participation in War, Peace and Security

  • Describe Canada’s and Canadians’ contributions to the war effort overseas during World War I and World War II (e.g. Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele, Hong Kong, Battle of the Atlantic, Dieppe, Sicily, D-Day; contributions of individuals; contributions of groups)
  • Describe Canada’s and Canadians’ contributions to the war effort at home during World War I and World War II, as well as some of the effects the wars had on the home front (e.g. munitions industry, Halifax explosion, women war workers, British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, Camp X, the war effort in local communities)

  • Methods of Historical Inquiry and Communication

    Research

  • Formulate different types of questions when researching historical topics and events
  • Gather information on Canadian history and current events from a variety of sources (e.g. textbooks and reference books, newspapers, internet) found in various locations (e.g. school, library, resource centre, museums, historic sites, community and government resources)
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources of information
  • Evaluate the credibility of sources and information
  • Organize and record information gathered through research (e.g. using notes, lists, concept webs, timelines, charts, maps, graphs, mind maps)
  • Formulate and use a thesis statement when researching a historical topic or issue
  • Interpretation and Analysis

  • Analyse information, employing concepts and theories appropriate to historical inquiry (e.g. chronology, cause and effect, short and long term consequences)
  • Distinguish between fact, opinion and inference in texts and visuals found in primary and secondary sources
  • Draw conclusions and make reasoned generalization or appropriate predictions on the basis of relevant and sufficient supporting evidence
  • Complete research projects that reflect of contain the elements of a historical inquiry process: preparation, research, thesis, supporting evidence, conclusion based on evidence
  • Communication

  • Express ideas, arguments and conclusions as appropriate for the audience and purpose, using a variety of styles and forms (e.g. reports, essays, debate, role playing, group presentations)
  • Use appropriate terminology to communicate results of inquiries to historical topics and issues

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